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Mountains, heaths and bogs

Mountains and moorlands dominate our landscape and are an important part of our national identity. They cover around 60% of our land area and form the largest extent of undeveloped wildlife habitat remaining in Britain.

The main habitats on our hills and moors are heaths, grasslands and peat bogs. These upland habitats stretch from the mountain tops down to the limits of enclosed agricultural land and onwards to sea-level in the far north and west.

From the ubiquitous heather to the rare mountain willows and from the mountain hare to the golden eagle, the plants and animals that live here are adapted to cope with the cool, windy climate and extremes of wet and dry.

Cross-leaved Heath (Erica tetralix. ©Laurie Campbell/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Heaths

Discover why Scotland's mountains and moorlands are an important part of what makes our country special

Coire nan Lochan, Glencoe. ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Peat bogs

Discover why Scotland's mountains and moorlands are an important part of what makes our country special.

Daisies and birds-foot trefoil growing on the Benbecula machair.  ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Grasslands

The fragrant thyme and the buzzing of the insects is an indication of the richness of our upland grasslands.

Thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and Alpine Ladies Mantle (Alchemilla alpinus). ©Niall Benvie/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Mountain heaths & willow scrub

Discover the plants of Scotland's windswept mountain heaths and willow scrub. They support a range of species, blueberry & heather to birds, ptarmigan & dotterel.

Clumps of parsley fern in acid scree at 1000m. ©Martin Faulkner/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Inland rock

Rocky outcrops occur as part of a mosaic of other habitats. It represents a limited, but distinctive habitat.

Red deer stag (Cervus elaphus). ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Moorland birds and mammals

Red deer, golden eagles, the mountain hare and grouse can all be found on Scotland's moors.


Related Links

Mountain plants

Mountain plants

Mountain flowers add a huge amount of colour and interest to the Scottish uplands.



Last updated on Monday 5th May 2014 at 10:35 AM. Click here to comment on this page