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Scotland's woodlands

Our native woodlands are one of the most characteristic elements of the Scottish landscape. From rocky shores of our varied coastline to the high mountains, Scotland has an exciting range of different woodland types. Each has its own unique and special magic. These woods are defined by the richness and diversity of our geology, soils, climate and topography.

The woods that clothe the hills and glens of Scotland have been shaped over the millennia by people working with nature and are home to many fascinating and beautiful species. From the ancient mighty oaks in our historic parklands to the gnarled and twisted dwarf trees high up at the treeline, Scotland has an incredible diversity of woodlands waiting to be explored.

Cadzow oaks, Chatelherault, Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve. İLorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Oakwoods

Discover the tranquil, green and mossy ancient oakwoods of Argyll and Lochaber. Find out more about their industrial history.

Pine tree in woodland. İLorne Gill/SNH.For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Caledonian pinewoods

Walk through an ancient Caledonian pinewood and maybe spot a Scottish crossbill.

Autumnal birchwood, Rannoch.  İLorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Birchwoods

Admire the graceful birchwoods of the Central Highlands. As well as birch these woodlands also contain willow, rowan and aspen.

Riparian woodland on the shoreline of a small loch at Barnlusagan.   İLorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Wet woods

Explore the wet woodland at Endrick Mouth, Loch Lomond and at the mouth of the Spey. These are some of Scotland's wildest woodland areas.

Rassal ash wood NNR. İSNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Ashwoods

The remaining patches of Scotland's ashwoods tend to be in inaccessible places such as steep ravines and rocky slopes.

Mature trees growing on parkland near New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway.  İLorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Wood pasture and parkland

Ancient wood pastures typically have large iconic open-grown ancient trees and grow in a field layer maintained by grazing.

Atlantic Hazel.�Sandy Coppins/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the SNH Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Atlantic hazel

Atlantic hazel is at its best in Scotland and supports a huge range of lichens and other species that are rare or absent elsewhere in Europe.

This woodland appears not to have been coppiced or to have received little coppice management. A continuous range of stem diameters can be seen. İDave Genney/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright/

Minor woodland types

There are other woodland types in Scotland too, such as montane scrub and aspen woods.

Woolly Willow. İLorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.

Montane scrub

Information on montane scrub



Last updated on Friday 1st March 2013 at 12:14 PM. Click here to comment on this page