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Opportunities for nature and people

We can work with nature to improve our response to climate change.

By changing how we manage Scotland's nature and landscapes, we can support our wild species and spaces and address the worst extremes of climate change. In doing so we will secure the fundamental ecosystem services that make our quality of life so rich and create better places for people to live.

The predicted impacts of climate change in Scotland provide a strong imperative for an urgent and effective response. It is a challenging task, but it presents us with the opportunity and incentive to redouble our efforts in enhancing Scotland's nature and landscapes, and to create greener, healthier, safer places for people to live.

By supporting Scotland-wide networks of healthy, resilient habitats we can enable many plant and animal species to disperse into new areas as the climate changes. We can help both our iconic species and the 'keystone' species, that are vital in sustaining the ecological systems we rely on for food, fuel and resources, to adapt to a changing climate.

But we can also work with natural processes to help society respond effectively to climate change. We can manage our woodlands and peatlands to store carbon, and we can harness the power of wind and waves to reduce our carbon emissions. We can plant trees and preserve bogs that help protect us from floods and we can maintain saltmarshes that support our wildlife and help protect our communities from rising sea levels.

Realising these opportunities depends on how we choose to plan for, manage and use our nature and landscapes. Find out more about how you can help nature help you respond to climate change.

Blanket bog, South Uist.  ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Mitigation

The role of our nature and landscapes in limiting our contribution to climate change



Last updated on Monday 30th April 2012 at 13:33 PM. Click here to comment on this page