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Discover Scotland's Great Trails

Scotland's Great Trails (SGTs) are nationally promoted trails for people-powered journeys. Each is distinctively waymarked, largely off-road and has a range of visitor services. At least 25 miles in length, they are suitable for multi-day outings as well as day trips. Collectively the 26 different routes provide over 1700 miles of well managed paths from the Borders to the Highlands, offering great opportunities to explore the best of Scotland's nature and landscapes and to experience our amazing history and culture.

Source to sea routes

From source to sea, follow some of our big rivers to their coastline. Breathe in the heady summer scents, picnic on the river banks and enjoy the chance to dip those hot, weary toes!

Coastal trails

If you're fond of seascapes and salty air, sand-dunes and seabirds - savour these coastal trails.

Historical trails

Take a journey back in time with these historical trails. You can follow in the footsteps of St Cuthbert, imagine Gregorian singing in the Borders Abbeys and trace the route used by drovers taking their beasts to market.  Or, for the less saintly, trace the life and times of notorious outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor and hear the echoes of marauding cattle thieves along the Cateran Trail.

Transport and travel fan?

You can enjoy two canal towpaths, joined at the Falkirk Wheel, and some of our old railway lines with these easy-going paths.

Mountains and lochs

If it's wild and wonderful you want, these trails have got it. Pack your sack to experience some of Scotland's dramatic mountain and loch scenery.

See Scotland your way!

As well as a wide choice of routes, there's also lots of ways to enjoy them. Do a bite-sized chunk with friends or family, perhaps doing a bit each weekend and bagging the whole route together. Join others on a guided walk or take part in a challenge event. Make a holiday of it, and let someone else carry your bag and provide your meals along the way.

Where will Scotland's Great Trails take you? 



Last updated on Monday 7th April 2014 at 15:36 PM. Click here to comment on this page