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Managing freshwater

Scotland has generally high quality rivers and lochs. The condition of the water in our rivers and lochs has major implications for our biodiversity, health, enjoyment of our countryside and our economy.

Good management of the activities on our fresh waters, or that affect their nature and landscapes is crucial. This will maintain their high quality or help restore them to a good status. 

Oak trees submerged by the flood waters of the River Tay at Stanley, Tayside and Clackmannanshire Area. ©Lorne Gill For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Flooding

Natural habitats can be used to help us manage flood risk. This brings benefits for biodiversity as well as for communities.

Salmon anglers fishing from a boat in the River Tay.__© Lorne Gill/SNH__For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Freshwater fisheries

Scotland's fisheries are world renowned and make a substantial contribution to local economies. We support sustainable fisheries.

Salmon cages, fish farm, Loch Eriboll, Lochaber. © Lorne Gill/SNH__For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Freshwater aquaculture

Fish farming is a vital industry in rural Scotland.

Laggan Dam. Lorne Gill/SNH For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

River engineering

Legislation is now a significant driver of the restoration of engineered river systems to their previously natural state.

Sewage Outfall Lorne Gill/SNH For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Water pollution

Meet the two different types of pollution that affect our fresh water - point source pollution and diffuse source pollution.

The tree lined River Tilt, Glen Tilt, Tayside and Clackmannanshire Area. ©Lorne Gill/SNH For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Catchment management

The Water Framework Directive is an ambitious piece of European environmental legislation, which aims to manage the water environment at a catchment scale

Species Action Framework North American signal crayfish. ©Colin Bean/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Aquatic non-natives

Invasive species represent one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity



Last updated on Monday 14th December 2009 at 10:31 AM. Click here to comment on this page