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Green networks

Habitat and green networks have some features and objectives in common, but they have different primary aims

A green network has multiple objectives, often with a primary aim of improving the environment for people, and usually to help to improve the economic status of an area, by making it a more attractive place to live and work.  In contrast, the primary objective of a habitat network is to enhance biodiversity.  However, a habitat network or an integrated habitat network may be a key component of a green network.

Developing a green network might involve the provision of paths or the creation of areas of open space, so that people have more opportunity to get out and about, which can improve their health and well being. It can also include the establishment of areas of land which act as sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS), helping to reduce flood risk. Many of these actions will also help to improve the economic status of an area, by making it a more attractive place to live and work. 

Some of the activities involved in developing a green network will also reduce habitat fragmentation, so a green network is likely to be delivering a broader range of benefits for both people and wildlife.

Green infrastructure and greenspace

Sometimes the components of a green network are referred to as green infrastructure - the paths, woods and open areas that constitute the network. You may also hear the term greenspace used, which usually refers to vegetated areas of open space within urban areas such as playing fields, allotments and cemeteries.  Please note, 'greenspace' is not the same as 'open space'

For more information on green infrastructure, please follow these links on urban green space and greening the built environment. You may also wish to see the guidance on green infrastructure produced for Natural England.  external site



Last updated on Tuesday 11th November 2014 at 14:43 PM. Click here to comment on this page