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Other national designations

There are other national designations as well as the main ones listed in the menu on the left of this page. They include: 

  • Forest Park and Woodland Park
  • Forest Nature Reserve and Caledonian Forest Reserve
  • Garden and designed landscape

Forest park & woodland park

These are non-statutory designations established and managed by the Forestry Commission Scotland.

Woodland parks (7) are areas where public recreation is a primary objective of management.

Forest parks (6) are extensive areas of forest managed for multiple benefits with particular emphasis on recreation.

These designations may overlap, and gain statutory protection from sites of special scientific interest and/or Natura sites.

Forest nature reserve & Caledonian forest reserve

These are established and managed by Forestry Commission Scotland.

Forest nature reserves (5) are the best conservation sites owned and managed by Forestry Commission Scotland. They were first established under section 19 of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 external site .

Caledonian forest reserves (16) are ancient and semi-natural woodland managed by Forestry Commission Scotland where environmental conservation is a primary objective of management.

These designations may overlap, and gain statutory protection from sites of special scientific interest and/or Natura sites.  Some are also managed as national nature reserves.

Garden and designed landscape

These are administered by Historic Scotland external site

Seal conservation area

The Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 provides for Scottish Ministers to designate "seal conservation areas". Five have been designated.  Four of these correspond with the areas of former Conservation of Seal (Scotland) Orders, namely

Shetland, Orkney, the Moray Firth and the East Coast of Scotland. 

A fifth, the Outer Hebrides, has been designated.

Marine Scotland is the relevant authority.  MS may not grant a licence authorising the killing or taking of seals in a seal conservation area unless they are satisfied that there is no satisfactory alternative way of achieving the purpose for which the licence is granted, and that the authorised killing or taking will not be detrimental to the maintenance of the population of any species of seal at a favourable conservation status in their natural range (within the meaning of Article 1(e) of the Habitats Directive).

More information is available at: www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/marine/Licensing/SealLicensing external site

You can contact Marine Scotland at: marinescotland@scotland.gsi.gov.uk  or by writing to: The Scottish Government, Victoria Quay. Edinburgh, EH6 6QQ

Significant seal haul-out

From 30th September 2014 it will be an offence under The Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 to "recklessly or intentionally harass" seals at 194 haul-outs around Scotland.

Marine Scotland is the relevant authority.  See contact details under seal conservation area, above.  Maps and guidance are available at www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/marine/marine-environment/species/19887/20814/haulouts external site .

 

Areas of special protection

Repealed in Scotland on 1 January 2012.  First established as 'sanctuaries' under the Protection of Birds Act and carried forward under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.  Repealed by the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011.  The provisions of ASPs had become replicated in more recent legislation.



Last updated on Monday 21st July 2014 at 11:53 AM. Click here to comment on this page