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Reintroducing native species

From time to time native species have been lost from our countryside. This can happen for a variety of reasons which include persecution or over-exploitation, the effect of introducing invasive non-native species, or habitat loss. Sometimes there may be a good chance that a species can be reintroduced into an area again, but only when we can be confident that certain conditions are met, such as being sure that the reasons for it originally dying out are no longer significant. In this way we can help to restore and reinvigorate Scotland's biodiversity.

These pages provide more information.

 

Policies, guidelines and working with others

Reintroduction projects are usually complicated. However, there are tried and tested methods and internationally recognised guidelines that we follow. We also work with many other organisations, and help to support the work of the National Species Reintroduction Forum.

Reintroduction is defined as restoring a species to parts of its natural range from which it has been lost. However it is just one type of 'conservation translocation'.

Conservation translocation is the catch-all term that refers to the deliberate movement and release of living organisms for conservation purpose. Translocation represents one of many different conservation actions. In most circumstances, management of species in their current localities, and wider habitat management, will be more cost-effective and lower risk. However, there are some situations where conservation translocations are appropriate. There is now a Scottish Code for Conservation Translocations and accompanying Best Practice Guidelines which provide a framework for evaluating whether and how to undertake such conservation translocations in Scotland.

 

Conservation translocations in practice

We have been involved in several conservation translocations, including through the Species Action Framework which ran from 2007-2012.

One of the more high profile projects is the Scottish Beaver Trial which is looking at how beavers interact with the Scottish environment. Final reporting will be in May 2015. 

 

National Species Reintroduction Forum logo (NSRF). İSNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 458541 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright

The National Species Reintroduction Forum

A Scottish forum to discuss strategic conservation translocation issues

National Species Reintroduction Forum - logo - İSNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 458541 or www.snh.gov.uk/copyright

Scottish Code for Conservation Translocations

A new approach to how we assess and plan conservation translocations

Jenny Lennon RSPB Project Officer with Aberdeen Red Kites Jenny Lennon is the RSPB Project Officer for the 2007 - 2010 Aberdeen Red Kite reintroduction.  These kites arrived in June 2007 and will be released late July or early August.

Scottish Beaver Trial

Final reporting for the Scottish Beaver Trial will be in May 2015.



Last updated on Friday 4th July 2014 at 11:58 AM. Click here to comment on this page