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Safeguarding biodiversity

Scottish Natural Heritage has a lead role in protecting Scotland's biodiversity and we do this in a variety of different ways like protecting special areas, species and habitats through legislation. But there is a lot more biodiversity out there, beyond those relatively few protected sites and species, which we also have a duty to protect.

Biodiversity is simply the variety of life - all living things around us; the plants, animals, insects in our forests, mountains, rivers, seas, gardens and parks, right down to the things living in our soils. It is the living bank balance which supports all our lives and is vital for our survival. Biodiversity provides us with crucial resources like fresh air and clean water for our daily lives and because it is basically our life support system it is really important that we look after it properly. But that is no easy task and it needs the help of many different people throughout Scotland and the UK to achieve this.

In the sections below you'll find out that biodiversity is significant in much of Scottish Natural Heritage's work including planning and development, climate change and rural development.

Find out about progress towards halting biodiversity loss in Scotland's Wildlife - an assessment of biodiversity in 2010.   PDF document

Farmland, birch woodland and conifer plantations, Upper Deeside . ©Lorne Gill/SNH For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

An ecosystems approach

Sustaining the benefits of a healthy environment

Motorbike bee from Biodiversity begins with a B film. © SNH 2010. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Biodiversity begins with a B

Scotland's biodiversity is amazing. We can all help to keep it special by taking a few simple actions.

gatewaymonday - People on a ranger guided walk with Liz Miller near Blair Atholl, Tayside and Clackmannanshire Area._©Lorne Gill/SNH_For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.org.uk

Working with others in Scotland

Scotland's biodiversity is a shared responsibility. SNH provides a leadership role in its care, but we cannot achieve this on our own.

Rhododendron ponticum. ©Lorne Gill/SNH. North Highland Area. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Non-native species

These are species which would not naturally occur here and have been introduced sometimes causing major problems for our native species and habitats.

A young white-tailed eagle at the east of Scotland release site. ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Reintroducing native species

We can enrich biodiversity by bringing back species which have been lost to our countryside.

Potato furrows and white clouds, Taymount, Stanley, Tayside and Clackmannanshire Area. ©Lorne Gill. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Libary on tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Biodiversity and soil

Soils and underlying rocks and landforms are important components of biodiversity. Find out about their importance here and in the section on geodiversity.

gatewaymonday - Serpulid worm in Loch Creran. ©Sue Scott/SNH

Priority Marine Features

Find out more about the habitats and species which we believe to be marine nature conservation priorities in Scotland's seas.

Breathing Places event, Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow. ©Lorne Gill/SNH. For information on reproduction rights contact the Scottish Natural Heritage Image Library on Tel. 01738 444177 or www.snh.gov.uk

Scotland's Nature Festival events

There are lots of events in 2013, including Scotland's Nature Festival (18-26 May).


Related Links

Species Action Framework

Species Action Framework

Our approach to species management focuses on delivering significant benefits to biodiversity and people.

Planning & development

Planning & development

Planning sustainable development is important to help prevent damage to biodiversity.

Rural Development Contracts

Rural Development Contracts

Part of the SRDP offers farmers, foresters and others funding to help deliver biodiversity benefits in rural Scotland.

Climate change

Climate change

Find out more about how climate change is predicted to affect Scotland's nature, landscapes and people.

Biodiversity

Biodiversity

Planners and developers have a key role to play in protecting and enhancing biodiversity



Last updated on Tuesday 23rd April 2013 at 14:40 PM. Click here to comment on this page