skip to main content

Licensing news - see what is happening in licensing this month!

Badgers and licensing

Badgers and their setts are protected by law in the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (as amended).  Licences are available for certain purposes to permit actions that might otherwise constitute an offence in relation to badgers or their setts.  Advice is provided below on licensing requirements for common scenarios in relation to badgers.  Links to the appropriate forms and guidance are given for situations where a licence is required.

Licensing during the badger breeding season

The badger breeding season runs from 1 December to 30 June. During this period badgers are most sensitive to disturbance and licences are not normally granted for works in the vicinity of badger setts.  

What is a badger sett?

The Protection of Badgers Act defines a badger sett as 'any structure or place which displays signs indicating current use by a badger'. We have produced guidance on what is a badger sett?  PDF document   to help people to make an assessment of what might or might not constitute a sett in order to inform their decisions for carrying out works around badger setts. This relies on monitoring setts and recording field signs and we encourage practitioners and potential licence applicants to familiarise themselves with this guidance.

General guidance for badger licence applications

One of the main reasons for badger licence applications being delayed is insufficient supporting information that fails to explain the works to be carried out and how they impact on badger setts.  This can often be resolved by providing clear and unambiguous maps and photographs.

To help alleviate this problem, and reduce the amount of time needed to assess badger licence applications, we have created a guidance document  PDF document  highlighting the type of information that is useful.

For further information or advice please email licensing@snh.gov.uk or telephone 01463 725364.



Last updated on Monday 28th March 2016 at 09:50 AM. Click here to comment on this page