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SNH Commissioned Report 933: Assessing the nature and use of corvid cage traps in Scotland: Part 3 of 4 - Trap operation and welfare

SNH Commissioned Report 933: Assessing the nature and use of corvid cage traps in Scotland: Part 3 of 4 - Trap operation and welfare

This work examines the current use and risks associated with the use of all traps permitted under Scottish Natural Heritage's General Licences. The work was carried out by Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) and the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT) and the project was overseen by a steering group consisting of representatives form RSPB, BASC, SNH and Scottish Government. It is published as a series of four reports.

Part 1 reports on the findings of a questionnaire survey of registered trap users to improve understanding of current corvid trapping practices in Scotland; establishing how and where they are used by practitioners and their effectiveness.

Part 2 reviewed evidence gathered on the day to day efficacy of corvid traps as used by practitioners across Scotland in 2014 and 2015. The aim was to provide a detailed snapshot of trap operation by practitioners across a calendar year, and relate their activities to the capture of both target and non-target species. The opportunity was also taken to examine the condition of both the decoy birds encountered, and of the traps in which they were kept.

Part 3 reports on field trials of traps permitted under General Licences, looking at how they were set, their catch and the behaviour and welfare implications of trapped birds.

Part 4 draws together the findings of Parts 1 to 3 and reviews their implications and recommendations and options for improving General Licences.

The work will be used to improve the clarity of General Licences and to ensure that traps permitted for use under them are adequately described and that they can operate humanely and selectively. The research will be used to inform the development of General Licences and possibly the development of a Code of Practice governing the use of traps under those licences.

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Format : 87 pages; 7.15MB
Published in 2016

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